Mayer Alloys Supply Chain Resources
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What to Expect When Packaging Large Vehicle Parts for Military Use

For companies that provide large land vehicle parts to the U.S. military, proper packaging is extremely complex. It’s difficult to find a competent partner who can understand your needs and help you handle your orders professionally.

Government customers require adherence to mil-specs, or military specifications, for products and packaging. Mil-spec packaging standards are very strict, so it’s a rigorous process to ensure they’re followed to the letter.

The key mil-spec packaging for large parts we’ll address below is MIL-STD-2073, which involves military packaging, including preservation, and packing for shipment. Here are some of the most common issues that arise with large land vehicle parts and how your company can overcome these challenges:

Special Military Packaging and Labeling

Large parts for military land vehicles are tricky to pack and ship due to their bulky, irregular sizes. Plus, the military distribution system is challenging to navigate, and any error in packaging or labeling brings the process to a halt. 

That could mean the parts would be returned to you and you will not get paid. You’ll need to follow special mil-spec labeling instructions down to the smallest detail under MIL-STD-129. 

What is an SPI?

In some cases, the solicitation will reference an SPI when referring to packaging instructions.  An SPI, or special packaging instruction, provides the full instructions required for the given part for preservation, packaging, and shipping. Even if you’re just the go-between for military or government customers, you must package the parts in compliance with the given SPI.

Preservation Methods and Why They’re Important

The U.S. military not only requires proper mil-spec packaging for large parts but also proper preservation so there is no loss in quality during shipping or storage. This accounts for how the item will be shipped, what time of year it will be shipped, and how, where, and for how long it will be stored. Your packaging partner will review the specifications and provide you with the necessary solution to comply with the required preservation method.

Types and Construction of Shipping Containers

The final stage before shipping is packing the part. Like the other stages in the process, there are strict standards.

Packing must use shipping containers that are in compliance with the stated mil-specs. There are two levels of packing involved here. Level A is for global-ready shipping that may involve rough handling and long-term storage. Its rules are the most stringent. This level requires strong and sturdy overseas containers.

Level B is the protection required to meet moderate worldwide shipping and storage conditions. Level B packing usually requires domestic wood crates, fiberboard containers, and fast-pack containers.

The Risk of Not Meeting Mil-Specs

Failure to handle the tasks described above appropriately could cause delays or even outright rejection of large land vehicle parts. It’s a costly hassle that also poses a risk to maintaining your place in the military supply chain. The federal government can’t work with partners who fail to follow the rules, even if the failure is inadvertent.

That’s why it’s a smart move to outsource your packaging and shipping process to Mayer Alloys Corporation, a packaging services provider with ample experience managing mil-spec packaging for large parts. Particularly for delicate and large land vehicle parts, outsourcing can be more cost-effective and efficient than setting up an on-site packaging and shipping operation.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What is mil-spec packaging for large parts?

Government customers require adherence to mil-specs, or military specifications, for products and packaging. This involves special packing and labeling to meet mil-spec requirements.

Why should it concern my business?

To work with government clients, companies must follow special mil-spec labeling instructions down to the smallest detail. Failure to follow mil-specs can result in the loss of lucrative government contracts.

What does SPI stand for?

SPI stands for special packaging instruction.

What are acceptable mil-spec packing materials?

Depending on the type of shipping, materials used in mil-spec packaging for large parts may include sturdy overseas containers, domestic wood crates, fiberboard containers, and fast-pack containers.

What container materials are allowed under MIL-STD-2073?

There are two levels of packing involved in this mil-spec. Level A is for global-ready shipping and long-term storage with sturdy overseas containers. Level B is the protection required to meet moderate worldwide shipping and includes domestic wood crates, fiberboard containers, and fast-pack containers.

 

Mayer Alloys Corporation brings together the resources to meet your manufacturing, assembly and supply chain needs. From metal distribution specializing in tin and lead products, to mil-spec, contract and hazmat packaging, warehouse and distribution services and electronic waste and scrap metal recycling. Contact us today to see how we can meet your needs!  



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